7 Historical Philosopher-Kings to Inspire You

In Plato’s Republic, Socrates envisions the ideal city-state. After describing life within his supposed utopia, his detractors press him on whether or not his dream could ever come to fruition. Socrates replies:  “Until philosophers are kings, or the kings and princes of this world have the spirit and power of philosophy … cities will neverContinue reading “7 Historical Philosopher-Kings to Inspire You”

Searching for Wisdom: A Socratic Social Commentary

Few people are more renowned for their knowledge and wisdom than Socrates. Though a legendary thinker himself, the ancient Greek philosopher struggled to find the root of wisdom in the greater world around him and was executed for exposing the irrationality of his peers. His famous line, “all I know is that I know nothing”Continue reading “Searching for Wisdom: A Socratic Social Commentary”

When Civilizations Collapse (Part Two): Lessons From Rome’s Fall

Like the civilizations of the late bronze age discussed in our previous article, the Roman Empire declined due to a synthesis of several factors. Economic issues, barbarian invasions, weakening cultural bonds, and political corruption all contributed to the fall of the West’s greatest empire. Two factors particularly relevant to Americans today are military overextension andContinue reading “When Civilizations Collapse (Part Two): Lessons From Rome’s Fall”

Codex Gigas: “The Devil’s Bible” and other Illuminated Manuscripts of the Medieval World

At ThinkingWest we often discuss books that have stood the test of time. These “classics” arose from the tremendous impact of their ideas, masterful command of the language, and storytelling power – not from their physical appearance. “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” we often hear, but today we are going to do justContinue reading “Codex Gigas: “The Devil’s Bible” and other Illuminated Manuscripts of the Medieval World”

Charlemagne: The Pupil and the Penitent

Charles the Great, known today simply as Charlemagne, is regarded as one of the most influential kings to ever rule. King of the Franks since 768 AD, he was crowned Holy Roman Emperor by the pope in 800, uniting most of western Europe under one banner for the first time since the Roman Empire. UnderContinue reading “Charlemagne: The Pupil and the Penitent”

Learning History, The Right Way

The typical history class goes like this: “The Peloponnesian War was fought by the Delian league, led by Athens, against the Peloponnesian League, led by Sparta, during the years spanning 341 to 404 BC. The Delian League leveraged the sea might of Athens, while the Spartans assaulted primarily by land. Ultimately the war was wonContinue reading “Learning History, The Right Way”

The Nazi Origins of Germany’s Ban on Homeschooling

Given that we are caught up in terms of the history of homeschooling (see here), there is one notable historical anecdote we have left out: the case of Germany, one of few western European countries with a complete ban on homeschooling. There is an irritating and pervasive habit to treat the passing of a lawContinue reading “The Nazi Origins of Germany’s Ban on Homeschooling”

The Case for Homeschooling (Part 2): The History of Home Education

If the history of education were a painting, homeschooling would be the backdrop upon which each stroke of the brush marks a new development, for better of worse, in how we teach our children. The painting is a very slow one to take shape, having still a countable number of wide strokes despite thousands ofContinue reading “The Case for Homeschooling (Part 2): The History of Home Education”

The Catholic Founding Father

More than 90% of the Founding Fathers of America were Protestant. These “Founding Fathers” are those who did one or more of the following: signed the Declaration of Independence signed the Articles of Confederation attended the Constitutional Convention of 1787 signed the Constitution of the United States of Americ served as Senators in the FirstContinue reading “The Catholic Founding Father”