Searching for Wisdom: A Socratic Social Commentary

Few people are more renowned for their knowledge and wisdom than Socrates. Though a legendary thinker himself, the ancient Greek philosopher struggled to find the root of wisdom in the greater world around him and was executed for exposing the irrationality of his peers. His famous line, “all I know is that I know nothing”Continue reading “Searching for Wisdom: A Socratic Social Commentary”

The Four Domains of War: From Self to Spiritual

Wherever there are people, there is war. Taken in its most general interpretation, bellum or war is a constant in the human condition. War was waged among the first men thousands of years ago; war is waged today; and war will be waged far into the future. Though war is constant, it is not necessarilyContinue reading “The Four Domains of War: From Self to Spiritual”

The Gnostic Roots of the Trans Movements

Some things just won’t go away. Denim jackets, bell bottoms, vinyl – some things tend to creep back into the mainstream just when you thought society had finally forgotten about them for good. Not just fashion either: ideas have a habit of popping up again after thoroughly being put to rest years or even centuriesContinue reading “The Gnostic Roots of the Trans Movements”

Insights from Fulton Sheen’s Way to Happiness

The Venerable Fulton Sheen encouraged generations of the faithful through his radio and television broadcasts in the mid 20th century. The bishop’s words carried a weight unmatched in his popular television program Life Is Worth Living, where he spoke to a live audience without a script, often touching on important contemporary issues like communism andContinue reading “Insights from Fulton Sheen’s Way to Happiness”

Are Humans Natural?: The Contradictory Ideas of How We Think About Our Species

Humanity is a strange thing. It cannot decide whether it is part of nature or apart from nature. Mankind’s identity crisis has emerged from the clashing of naturalist and theistic philosophies, with political, religious, and philosophical fallout on how we treat ourselves. The Scope of Scientific Inquiry No matter how good the science is, itContinue reading “Are Humans Natural?: The Contradictory Ideas of How We Think About Our Species”

Codex Gigas: “The Devil’s Bible” and other Illuminated Manuscripts of the Medieval World

At ThinkingWest we often discuss books that have stood the test of time. These “classics” arose from the tremendous impact of their ideas, masterful command of the language, and storytelling power – not from their physical appearance. “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” we often hear, but today we are going to do justContinue reading “Codex Gigas: “The Devil’s Bible” and other Illuminated Manuscripts of the Medieval World”

How I Read the Bible Cover to Cover

A week ago I finished a two year journey of reading the Bible from Genesis to Revelations. The Bible is a long and difficult book; yet, it is the most widely printed book in history. As any book publisher would know, “long and difficult” is rarely a promising description of a book that will receiveContinue reading “How I Read the Bible Cover to Cover”

How Good and Evil Ignore Tribal Lines

Every hero story, every epic fantasy tale ultimately distills into a force of good coming against a force of evil, and it’s the struggle between the two that drives an interesting plot, because it alludes to the battle between good and evil in our own world. In the polarized world, traditional morality has been thrownContinue reading “How Good and Evil Ignore Tribal Lines”

3 Ways St. Augustine’s Confessions Describes the Fallen Modern World

St. Augustine of Hippo was born in Northern Africa in the 4th century AD. A bishop of the Hippo Regius region in Numidia, he is widely considered one of the most influential early Christians, mainly due to his prolific writings. Despite his saintly status, Augustine lived a worldly life before his conversion, and documented hisContinue reading “3 Ways St. Augustine’s Confessions Describes the Fallen Modern World”

Christian Themes and Imagery in C.S. Lewis’s The Silver Chair

I recently revisited my childhood and cracked open C.S Lewis’s The Silver Chair, the sixth book in his acclaimed Chronicles of Narnia series. As a child the book was a personal favorite of mine – I always appreciated its straightforward adventure plot (boy and girl set out to rescue an enchanted prince from an evilContinue reading “Christian Themes and Imagery in C.S. Lewis’s The Silver Chair”