The Importance of Good Conversation

Read Plato, St. Augustine, Jonathan Swift, Emily Bronte, or any other classic work and you’ll notice the authors’ composition, vocabulary, and coherence in thought far surpass those possessed by the vast majority of educated people today. Even students of our best liberal arts universities don’t emerge from their studies with the ability to write, speak,Continue reading “The Importance of Good Conversation”

Don Quixote and The Difference Between Wisdom and Intelligence

Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote excellently portrays wisdom’s distinction from intelligence through the character growth (or at least revelation) of Don Quixote and his trusted squire Sancho Panza. While both play the part of the fool in many respects, both exhibit moments of intelligence or wisdom throughout their adventures. The Intelligent Don Quixote Don QuixoteContinue reading “Don Quixote and The Difference Between Wisdom and Intelligence”

Why a Classical Education is Needed Now More than Ever

If you were to ask yourself what single aspect of education is lacking in modern society, what would it be? What topic, if better integrated into school curricula, would benefit the world the most? Teaching science and technology better? It seems we have plenty of the technical aspects of education in place today: everyone knowsContinue reading “Why a Classical Education is Needed Now More than Ever”

The Nazi Origins of Germany’s Ban on Homeschooling

Given that we are caught up in terms of the history of homeschooling (see here), there is one notable historical anecdote we have left out: the case of Germany, one of few western European countries with a complete ban on homeschooling. There is an irritating and pervasive habit to treat the passing of a lawContinue reading “The Nazi Origins of Germany’s Ban on Homeschooling”

The Case for Homeschooling (Part 2): The History of Home Education

If the history of education were a painting, homeschooling would be the backdrop upon which each stroke of the brush marks a new development, for better of worse, in how we teach our children. The painting is a very slow one to take shape, having still a countable number of wide strokes despite thousands ofContinue reading “The Case for Homeschooling (Part 2): The History of Home Education”

The Case for Homeschooling (Part 1): The Strangeness of the Anti-Homeschool Movement

With the COVID19 crisis virtualizing school instruction and giving many parents a taste of homeschooling life, the topic of home education is hotter than ever. Particularly, a recent Harvard Magazine article by Erin O-Donnell has brought a firestorm from homeschool supporters – and for good reason. The article denounces the practice of homeschooling through remarksContinue reading “The Case for Homeschooling (Part 1): The Strangeness of the Anti-Homeschool Movement”

COVID19: A Call for Greater Family Independence

The lockdown initiated by government reactions to COVID19 (the coronavirus) has imposed a rare glimpse into how elements of dystopian novels manifest in the real world: restricted travel, skyrocketing unemployment, an economy in recession, police arrests for routine outdoor activities, masks and gloves merely for grocery store visits, and semi-rationed groceries (for the very highContinue reading “COVID19: A Call for Greater Family Independence”

Epiousios: The Mysterious Greek Word in the Lord’s Prayer

This post is not the same one I originally intended. Several days ago I thought a nice subject to write about would be the history of the Lord’s Prayer (also known as the “Our Father”). It does have some interesting history, as we can trace its origin directly to scripture in the books of MatthewContinue reading “Epiousios: The Mysterious Greek Word in the Lord’s Prayer”

Christian Faith: Feelings Not Required

Human Reason and Emotion The gears turning within man appear driven by two distinct forces: reason and emotion. When these two forces work against one another, the stronger of the two, fed by natural or nurtured inclinations, dominates to control our actions. Oppositely, reason and emotion may on occasion act in concert, resulting in decisiveContinue reading “Christian Faith: Feelings Not Required”

What Gulliver’s Travels Can Teach Us About Perspective, Social Media, and Friendship

My first encounter with Gulliver’s Travels was a cheesy 90’s movie that did even less justice to the original story than director Darren Aronofsky’s 2014 movie Noah did to the Biblical story of Noah. In the minds of many without an adequately wide reading of classic literature, Gulliver’s Travels (1726) is a children’s story. However,Continue reading “What Gulliver’s Travels Can Teach Us About Perspective, Social Media, and Friendship”